adobestock 202353053 1 Often treatment programs exist in a vacuum of sorts. Everything is great when the young person is in the program, especially in the case of residential treatment facilities. The problem comes when the teenager completes his residential treatment and returns home. Now he returns to school and there is a stigma about what he was doing, and the young man can end up with feelings of shame.

At Monuments we make it our mission for our young men to see our facility and our staff as a place of healing. We want them to consider their time here and when they return home as a rite of passage. The goal is for them to be elevated in their treatment experience, not stigmatized. When this happens, elevation occurs and outcomes for both our young men and their families are more successful for the long term.

Stages

At Monuments, we view these rites of passage as a process for our young men to become relevant to themselves, their families, and their communities. Throughout the program they will learn to understand themselves through the therapeutic process, gain confidence while engaging in traditional and progressive education, and strengthen relationships through horsemanship principles.

Monuments provides the place for these young men to separate from the “old self,” transition from the “old” to “new,” and reintegrate with their community as relevant young men.

  • Separation — When our young men arrive at Monuments, their separation stage begins. It’s important to separate from their home community, trading it for a place of their own where they can learn and grow. Separation isn’t meant as isolation in any way. It simply means these young men are separating from their former lives.
  • Transition — Also known as the liminal phase, transition at Monuments means our young men are not in their old places but they are not in their new places either. Transition is important, as it allows the young man to see where he was and, more importantly, where he wants to go and what kind of person he wants to be. This stage is where identity is formed, a new role in the family is assumed, and preparation to reintegrate into the community occurs.
  • Reintegration — At Monuments we are focused on preparing our young men to become relevant in their communities. This happens during transition as they are prepared to reintegrate into their communities. Our young men prepare to reintegrate into not only their communities, but also back into their families. An important part of this phase is for the young man to understand that his “old” life and old friends and groups need to be replaced, for the most part, with like-minded people what share his same new interests and passions.

Do you have a teenage boy who struggles with addiction or other disorders? Call the team at Monuments, (800) 559-1980, and let’s discuss how we can help.

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We Can't Wait to Meet You

Our Location

815 West 200 South 2
Parowan, UT 84761

Contact Us

banner logo white

We Can't Wait to Meet You

Our Location

815 West 200 South 2
Parowan, UT 84761

Contact Us

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