Treatment Program In this month’s two blogs, we’re going to get into one of the areas we specialize in at Monuments — impulse control disorder. This is a disorder that doesn’t receive the same amount of attention as others but is thought to affect over 10 percent of the general population.

Let’s get into some specifics.

What is impulse control disorder?

Impulse control disorder is a condition in which a person has trouble controlling emotions or behaviors. These behaviors often create conflicts with others, with societal norms, and even with the law. Examples of impulse control disorders include oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, intermittent explosive disorder, kleptomania, and pyromania.

Common types of impulse control disorders

These disorders usually appear in childhood or adolescence. They are slightly more common in males than females. They also commonly occur with other mental health disorders or substance abuse.

  • Intermittent explosive disorder — Characterized by persistent impulsive and angry outbursts. The person may be violent or aggressive toward people, animals, or property. Tirades are usually triggered by a minor issue with someone the person knows.
  • Oppositional defiant disorder — People with this disorder are easily annoyed, often angry or resentful. They challenge authority figures, flout rules, bother others on purpose, and blame others for their problems.
  • Conduct disorder — This disorder consists of persistent behavior that violates social rules. This usually occurs in people under the age of 18. The person may be aggressive toward people or animals, destroy other people’s property, lie or steal, or violate rules, such as running away or skipping school at an early age.
  • Kleptomania — Impulsive and unnecessary stealing of things that are not needed. This disorder isn’t about the things being stolen but is about the compulsion to steal and lack of self-control over this compulsion.
  • Pyromania — This disorder leads the person to repeatedly and deliberately set fires. This involves an attraction or obsession with fire and fire-setting paraphernalia, along with a compulsive need to set fires. Setting fires is compulsive and it relieves the person’s mounting tension.

In this month’s second blog we will delve into other aspects of impulse control disorders and how we treat them at Monuments.

Do you have a possible teenage boy who is exhibiting any signs of impulse control disorders? Call us at Monuments, (800) 559-1980. We can help.

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Parowan, UT 84761

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We Can't Wait to Meet You

Our Location

815 West 200 South 2
Parowan, UT 84761

Contact Us

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