Our Treatment Philosophy

Treatment as a Rite of Passage

Treatment needs to be a place of healing and not a place of shame. Too often, young men that have been a part of treatment have been stigmatized. Monuments believes that these young men and their families should be elevated in their treatment experience and not stigmatized.

If treatment is seen as a rite of passage, elevation occurs. Rites of passage provide a process for these young men to become relevant to themselves, their family and their community. Throughout the program they will learn to understand themselves through the therapeutic process, gain confidence while engaging in traditional and progressive education, and strengthen relationships through horsemanship principles. Monuments provides a place for them to separate from their “old self”, transition from the “old” to “new” and reintegrate with their community as relevant young men.

Separation

Separation can be either symbolic or physical from the former self. This stage usually occurs when a young man is placed in treatment (wilderness, residential, etc). Separation provides space to not only work on the issues that brought him to Monuments but also a place of his own to learn and grow, separate from his home community. It is important to note that separation does not mean isolation. Throughout treatment, these young men are engaging with their family, developing strong peer relationships, and receiving mentorship from staff, teachers and the community.

Transition

Transition or liminal phase represents a place of not being in the old and also not in the new. This is where change occurs. This space allows the young man to see where he was and where he wants to be. Here is where identity is formed, a new role in the family takes place, and preparation to reintegrate into their community occurs. Young men are honored throughout Transition with individual Monuments that recognize important traits and/or values.

Reintegration

Most programs focus on transition from treatment to home. We believe transition occurs while in treatment and one of the most important components is the young man’s ability to be relevant in his own community. Our young men are prepared throughout the transition stage to reintegrate into their community.

This occurs relationally (both peers and family), therapeutically as they understand their challenges in the context of their family system, and through our progressive education framework that allows these young men to find themselves engaging in activities that create a new community to return to. Reintegration allows the young man in a new state to surround himself with like-minded people that share his same interests and passions.

How Do You Know If Treatment Is Relevant and Your Son Has Been Elevated?

  • New skills are formed
  • Achieved resolution around painful event(s)
  • Relationships have been mended
  • Families have adapted to the appropriate developmental stage
  • New knowledge has been gained
  • A sense of self has been developed

Stigmatized

  • Leaving tx with negative labels you didn’t go in with
  • Treatment was imposed vs co-created
  • Lack of a safe place/forced to face things outside of comfort zone
  • No voice in the process of healing

For The Relevant Learning Value:

Most programs focus on transition from treatment to home. We believe transition occurs while in treatment and one of the most important components is the young man’s ability to be relevant in his own community. This occurs relationally (both peers and family), therapeutically as they understand their challenges in the context of their family system, and through our progressive education framework that allows these young men to find themselves engaging in activities that create a new community to return to. Reintegration allows the young man in a new state to surround himself with like-minded people that share his same interests and passions.