Teen depression is one of the most serious health issues facing this age group. It can overwhelm a person, affecting how they think, feel, and act, and it can lead to emotional, functional, and physical problems.

Male teenage depression is one of our main focuses at Monuments, where we help our patients learn new ways of dealing with depression through cognitive behavioral therapy and experiential therapy.

Depression doesn’t follow one path

It’s easy to assume that depression is depression, but that’s not the case. Adult depression can be different from teen depression, and treating teens requires different approaches in many cases.

Being a teenager is never easy with raging hormones, peer pressure, parental pressure, constantly changing bodies, and other stresses. Part of being a teenager is the emotional and psychological ups and downs. But for some teens, it’s beyond that — these aren’t temporary feelings, they’re a symptom of depression.

Symptoms of teen depression

Teen depression usually involves changes in behavior, outlook, or attitude that leads to problems at school or home, with social activities, or other areas. Here are some of those changes:

Emotional changes

  • Feelings of sadness, including crying spells for no apparent reason
  • Frustration or feelings of anger, often over seemingly small issues
  • Feeling hopeless or empty
  • Irritable or annoyed mood
  • Loss of interest or taking pleasure in usual activities
  • Loss of interest in, or conflict with, family and friends
  • Low self-esteem
  • Feelings of worthlessness or guilt
  • Fixation on past failures or exaggerated self-blame/self-criticism
  • Excessive sensitivity to rejection or failure, need for excessive reassurance
  • Trouble concentrating, making decisions, remembering
  • Ongoing sense that life and the future are grim and bleak
  • Frequent thoughts of death, dying, or suicide

Behavioral changes

  • Tiredness, low energy
  • Insomnia or sleeping too much
  • Changes in appetite
  • Use of alcohol or drugs
  • Agitation or restlessness
  • Slowed thinking, speaking, or body movements
  • Frequent complaints of unexplained body aches and headaches
  • Social isolation
  • Poor school performance
  • Frequent school absence
  • Less attention to personal hygiene or appearance
  • Angry outbursts, disruptive or risky behavior, other acting-out behaviors
  • Self-harm, such as cutting, burning, excessive piercings
  • Making a suicide plan or suicide attempt

If you wonder if your male teenager is struggling with depression, please give us a call at Monuments, (800) 559-1980, we are here to help.

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Parowan, UT 84761

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We Can't Wait to Meet You

Our Location

815 West 200 South 2
Parowan, UT 84761

Contact Us

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